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You Shouldn’t Care About 'Suicide Squad.' And That’s Okay.

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You Shouldn’t Care About ‘Suicide Squad.’ And That’s Okay.

It’s the golden age of superhero films, but based on the response critics are having with Suicide Squad and Batman v Superman you wouldn’t know it. Fans of DC Comics are up in arms–even signing a petition to take down reviews of Suicide Squad on Rotten Tomatoes–and the frustration is understandable! Marvel seems to have a surefire hit twice a year (soon three times a year even) so it’s difficult to see their beloved characters getting slammed by reviewers. Here’s the thing, though: we shouldn’t care about this film anyway. And here’s six reasons why.

You Shouldn’t Care About 'Suicide Squad.' And That’s Okay.

1. The movie isn’t all that good.

Let’s start with the most important aspect: after seeing it Thursday night I can confer with most critics in saying this film is nothing special. It’s an okay action film that’s dragged down by too many characters who you won’t care about. When it tries to get emotional or make this team feel like they care about each other, it’s not earned and eye-rollingly bad. The villain is also throwaway at best (especially the main villain’s goons who are basically Putties from Power Rangers. This way the characters can kill them mercilessly and still get a PG-13 rating). You’ll never actually care whether these characters live or die and the film never tells a thematic story. It’s like one long struggle to get to the end so as to see how this might connect to future films.

It attempts to set up the Joker while telling another story entirely, and while the Joker is actually a highlight of the film, the entire movie itself is skippable at best. Which leads me to number 2.

2. Suicide Squad has possibly the worst post-credit scene ever.

I won’t spoil this scene, but let’s just say it undermines not only how they set up the Justice League metahumans in Batman v Superman, it undermines the entire premise of the Justice League seen in the recent trailer. It also undermines Batman, what he stands for, what his whole deal is and it does all of this to simply pump up a character in Suicide Squad. Never seeing or at the very least instantly forgetting this scene ever happened will help you have some respect for DC movies.

3. Warner Brothers has already cut $200 million in annual costs from their budgets to make room for more movies.

Back in 2014 Warner Brothers made drastic cuts including cutting 1,000 jobs worldwide to add money to their coffers for more films. What does that mean? Even if Suicide Squad fails they’ll have recouped the cost via these cuts and can keep chugging along.

You Shouldn’t Care About 'Suicide Squad.' And That’s Okay.
The interim heroes before we get the good stuff next year.

4. Suicide Squad proves we need a Harley/Joker film, but you already knew that.

Suicide Squad basically teases cool elements, but either doesn’t pull them off, or never actually delivers. Case in point is the relationship between Harley and Joker. We get a few flashbacks showing what their dynamic is like, but it’s always short-lived and appears much more dynamic than what we’re seeing. If or when they do make a film about them I’ll be first in line.

You Shouldn’t Care About 'Suicide Squad.' And That’s Okay.
Me and you, and you and me…

5. The comics do a better job with Suicide Squad anyway.

DC Comics has recently relaunched the team for their Rebirth series and quite frankly it’s better than this film. In fact, you can see a much more interesting and developed Harley Quinn (although Robbie does do a fantastic job bringing to life the character we loved from Batman: The Animated Series) in the comics who has become more complex and independent.

You Shouldn’t Care About 'Suicide Squad.' And That’s Okay.
Harley fans have great options to read more of her in the comics.

6. In more ways than one, Suicide Squad feels like an interim film while we wait for DC to get their ducks in a row.

Love or hate Batman v Superman, you can’t deny it gave us a taste of Wonder Woman and Batman in such a way that makes you want to see more. This film teases a bit with Batman and a few other elements most of us are much more interested in seeing than the anti-heroes in this film. You may be a huge Harley Quinn fan, but you can’t deny the Wonder Woman trailer is making you all kinds of giddy for that film. Batman may have cried “Martha”, but tell me his badass fight sequence to save Superman’s mom didn’t make you want a full-length Batfleck film yesterday.

Can anyone honestly say Suicide Squad was at the top of their list of next DC films they must see? We may have had high hopes, and even been jazzed by the great marketing material, but unfortunately, it turned out to be a dud we can easily skip as we wait for DC to get their ducks in a row.

Conclusion

Suicide Squad is a mediocre action film and not for lack of trying. Much of the acting is top-notch, and the special effects aren’t bad either (considering the 175 million dollar budget they damn well better be), but unfortunately the experience will leave you bored or at the very least wanting more. Based on my points above though, that’s okay.

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