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Black Panther and the Agents of Wakanda Vol. 1: Eye of the Storm Review
Marvel

Comic Books

Black Panther and the Agents of Wakanda Vol. 1: Eye of the Storm Review

Go deep into classic Marvel characters and lore as Jim Zub brings back some blasts from the past.

It should come as no shock when I say the Agents of Wakanda is a really weird team. Writer Jim Zub says as much in a letter at the back of this book. It’s a bizarre mix, which is probably its biggest appeal. To see so many obscure characters getting support from Black Panther and doing their best to fill in in a world that no longer has S.H.I.E.L.D. is quite a cool thing. This trade paperback collects the first six issues and it contains three separate two-part stories. That adds to the appeal factor since it gives readers three entirely different stories to enjoy. If you don’t like one, you can move on to the next one!

Zub and artist Lan Medina open this book with a hilarious villain group that might have you in stitches. Dubbed the Scavengers (pronounced like “Avengers” with a “sc-” at the front), we’re introduced to most of this team via a car chase. It’s an exciting sequence that puts Wasp and John Jameson at the forefront of characters to pay attention to. Wasp is the leader of the group and she doesn’t jive too well with Jameson. The unease seems to be no issue for Black Panther, who cuts into the book so as to give the team their next mission ala Charlie in Charlie’s Angels. Soon we’re learning all about Fat Cobra, Ka-Zar, and all the rest. This leads to a full-throttle fight sequence with some satisfying fight scene moments. The book also comes with a cliffhanger that should have longtime Marvel readers talking.

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Medina’s style suits the offbeat nature of this team and the types of villains they come up against here. A standout page features Okoye detailing where four of the members of this team are in the world and what they’re up to beautifully. It’s a nicely collaged set of panels surrounding Okoye that is framed with a futuristic metallic structure tying it all together. It also ties well into the hologram tech being used in the scene.

Old School Marvel Comics Fans Will Enjoy This

Following this two-parter is a story involving the Moon, Mockingbird joining the team, and two deep-cut Marvel characters. Titled “God Loves, Moon Kills,” the title is a play on Chris Claremont’s classic tale. This story gets a bit wacky with its cosmic connections and alternate dimensions, giving it a classic Marvel feel. I won’t spoil who pops up, but there are some interesting ideas at work here that likely play a part in current and future 2020 stories. J.J. Jameson’s son, for instance, has a part to play and he’s currently the main character in Ravencroft. Medina does well with this chunk of story with some excellent flashbacks to go with it.

Wrapping up the book is a Deadpool adventure where he sort of joins the team. Zub has a great handle on the character, and shows that other characters reacting to him bears the most comedic fruit. There’s a clever reintroduction of a classic team lead by Nick Fury that’s also interesting. It’s another sign this series was mining retired or forgotten characters and ideas, further making this a joy to read for the longtime Marvel fan. Zub is teamed up with Scot Eaton on this two-parter and he has quite a good sense of how to draw Deadpool with all the quirks that come with him.

This is a good fight comic that offers something a little different for the hardcore Marvel fan.

Black Panther and the Agents of Wakanda Vol. 1: Eye of the Storm
Is it good?
Action, adventure, and crazy ideas make this a wild adventure and a good fight comic.
Fun read with three two-part stories and some deep-cut Marvel characters mixing things up
Both artists do well to capture the weirdness each story gets into
The identity of the book becomes clear halfway through (weird, wacky stories every two issues) since the team lineup changes so much
8
Good
Comments

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