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Fantastic Five: Week of September 2, 2020

Comic Books

Fantastic Five: Week of September 2, 2020

The best reviewed comic books of the week on AIPT.

Every week, comic fandom is gifted with a slew of fantastic stories from a slew of fantastic creators. These days there’s just so much good stuff out there that it can be a bit overwhelming, especially if you’re new to comics. Thus AIPT presents to you, Fantastic Five! A weekly column where we pick five fantastic books released during the week and tell you why you should take a chance on them via a snippet from our reviews.

Enjoy, and happy reading!

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Lost Soldiers #2

Words by Ales Kot. Art by Luca Casalanguida.

Artist Luca Casalanguida has created one of the most refined and nuanced visual portraits of soldiers I’ve ever had the privilege to review. At times messy and energized, but emotionally rendered, there is such a beautiful distillation in how this artist depicts these characters. From his time collaborating with Kot on James Bond: The Body, Casalanguida has always been a master at properly humanizing a simple trope or arc. Simple shots of faces or even looming images of impending danger coming to the scene all coalesce into a truly unique atmosphere. (10/10)

–Arbaz M. Khan

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Alien: The Original Screenplay #2

Words by Cristiano Seixas. Art by Guilherme Balbi.

I couldn’t put Alien: The Original Screenplay #2 down, and I’ve seen Alien a hundred times. It’s fascinating to see an alternate take on the source material (albeit the material isn’t quite what the final film used), but it’s also exciting to see how well-drawn it looks and how expertly it’s paced. Screw adaptation, this book is impeccably strong on its own merits. (9.5/10)

–David Brooke

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The Dreaming: Waking Hours #2

Words by G. Willow Wilson. Art by Nick Robles.

If you’re a lover of storytelling, you cannot miss ‘Walking Hours’. There’s so much in this issue I’m positively boiling over with glee thinking about it. ‘The Dreaming: Waking Hours’ is enchanting, elegantly realized, and filled with wonder. (9.5/10)

–David Brooke

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Fantastic Four #23

Words by Dan Slott. Art by Paco Medina.

Fantastic Four #23 is a great finale to the Empyre story arc and a reminder of how this team does their best work when they think their way through a problem. On the other side of the coin, Wolverine and Spider-Man punch up the action, providing the best of both worlds in this issue. This is one of the strongest examples of how a tie-in can matter as much as the event itself. (9/10)

–David Brooke

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Fire Power #3

Words by Robert Kirkman. Art by Chris Samnee.

Fire Power #3 is a comic that is lighter than air yet tension lingers on the fringe always. This is a story about starting over and trying to make a new path while the past continues calling. When there is no punching or kicking this book is incredibly relaxing, really bringing you to peace. In many ways, Fire Power is recommended reading for anyone who likes a relatable tale with sublime martial arts and a story with plenty of soul. (9/10)

–David Brooke

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