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Is It Good? Sundowners #2 Review

Comic Books

Is It Good? Sundowners #2 Review

With the kidnapping of Karl Volf, the Sundowners support group turns into an investigative team as the hunt for their friend begins. Along the way, they encounter the missing member of their support group, gain information about their support group host, and are confronted with the possibility that their call to heroism may all be mental. So, is it good?


Sundowners #2 (Dark Horse Comics)


Is It Good? Sundowners #2 Review

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As appealing as it was, Seeley’s first issue left us wanting more (specifically more answers). The second issue gives us some, but is unfortunately accompanied by more questions. We begin at the scene of the kidnapping where the Sundowners are still awakening from getting their butts handed to them by what appears to be their individual “enemies” united. Crowlita’s head abnormality, where we ended last issue, is quickly written off as an apparent hallucination of The Citizen (is this Seeley just providing evidence for their insanity or is something else at play?).

We are also quickly introduced to yet another member of the support group known as Mr. Outsider: The Desolate Avenger. Besides his eccentricity and inflated ego, this “hero” actually seems pretty competent and Jim Terry gives him a pretty cool design. Mr. Outsider joins the group in attempting to find Karl, with the main three seeking out Dr. Shrejeic and the Desolate Avenger going it the only way he knows, alone (he’s super dramatic and it’s pretty entertaining). Spoiler: I was actually really disappointed when he got eaten at the end, I was really liking his character and I hope Seeley is open for introducing more Sundowners.

Is It Good? Sundowners #2 Review

This issue provides more individual character development as each of them are questioned about or begin to self-doubt their roles as heroes. Seeley has done a great job thus far presenting a balance of evidence for both their sanity and their madness. After this issue we are still left to ponder the true nature of these characters. The art, both the panel art as well as the cover, continue to excel. The color palette is much more extensive than most comics I’m reading right now and the characters really pop against the darker toned backgrounds.

Is It Good?

With the wit of the writing and the opportunity to explore each character’s lives individually, you’re confronted with the struggle to pick a favorite character (which is challenging because they’re all really likeable). The comic is very well organized to say the least, and the only complaint I have yet again is that I now have even more questions. Although, this is like any mystery-based series; fans want to know the answers, but they really don’t want the answers. As a reader we enjoy getting pulled along and frustrated, but next issue Seeley has to throw us a bone. Sundowners is still at the top of my list.

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