Connect with us
The City on the Other Side Review

Comic Books

The City on the Other Side Review

A young girl navigates a mysterious world.

Written by Mairghread Scott with artwork by Robin Robinson, The City on the Other Side follows a young girl, Isabel, as she gets sucked into an alternate dimension of sorts — the titular City on the Other Side. In doing so, she finds herself in the middle of a war she doesn’t quite understand.

Aimed at younger readers, The City on the Other Side is a well-paced fantasy. Older readers will recognize certain tropes and story patterns, but Mairghread Scott’s story is well executed and Isabel’s journey (both internal and external) is engaging. There’s humor and whimsy mixed in with drama that is fitting for the target audience. In addition to Isabel, the book introduces a number of supporting characters, from the mushroom fairy, Button, to Benjie, a young boy who Isabel encounters towards the middle of the story. Each of these characters make their mark on the story — no one feels unnecessary or pointless.

Listen to the latest episode of our weekly comics podcast!

The City on the Other Side Review

Robin Robinson’s looser art style really captures the tone of the story. Dynamic facial expressions throughout the book really help convey the emotions to the readers. In particular, Robinson’s style makes dynamic use of the characters’ eyes, diminishing or expanding the pupils depending on the emotion being conveyed. It isn’t realistic at all, but it’s evocative and gives a good feeling of stakes even when we know that our heroine isn’t at risk.

Robinson’s color palette is a mixture of pastels and vibrant highlights, giving the book a dreamlike quality that draws the reader in. The fear with a muted look is that the book picks up a muddy “sameness” but Robinson minimizes the use of grays and sepia tone to maintain a visual diversity to the book’s pages.

Is It Good?

The City on the Other Side is a charming tale of a young girl on an adventure. Mairghread Scott and Robin Robinson have created a visually arresting story. There aren’t many surprises for adults here, but for a book aimed at younger readers, this is solid stuff with a complexity that acknowledges the intelligence of its target audience without talking down to them.

The City on the Other Side Review
The City on the Other Side
Is it good?
An entertaining fantasy story with an engaging lead, The City on the Other Side is a great read and should provide serious entertainment for its target audience.
Isabel and the supporting cast are a lot of fun.
Robin Robinson’s artwork, both in terms of the line art and the colors, is fantastic, keeping the book visually interesting without putting style over substance.
This is a kid’s book, and so in some ways, it’s completely understandable that nothing would be unpredictable. Still, it would have been nice to see at least one twist or turn to the plot that could catch adults off guard.
8
Good

Like what we do here at AIPT? Consider supporting us and independent comics journalism by becoming a patron today! In addition to our sincere thanks, you can browse AIPT ad-free, gain access to our vibrant Discord community of patrons and staff members, get trade paperbacks sent to your house every month, and a lot more. Click the button below to get started!

Comments

In Case You Missed It

X-Men Monday #111 - Anthony Oliveira & Steve Orlando Talk ‘Marvel’s Voices: Pride’ X-Men Monday #111 - Anthony Oliveira & Steve Orlando Talk ‘Marvel’s Voices: Pride’

X-Men Monday #111 – Anthony Oliveira & Steve Orlando Talk ‘Marvel’s Voices: Pride’

Comic Books

X-Men Monday #110 - Jordan D. White Answers Your Hellfire Gala Week 2 Questions X-Men Monday #110 - Jordan D. White Answers Your Hellfire Gala Week 2 Questions

X-Men Monday #110 – Jordan D. White Answers Your Hellfire Gala Week 2 Questions

Comic Books

Planet-Size X-Men #1 Planet-Size X-Men #1

‘Planet-Size X-Men’ #1 wants to be bigger than it is, but promises an era of expansion

Comic Books

A word on some recently published articles A word on some recently published articles

A word on some recently published articles

Feature

Connect
Newsletter Signup