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'Avengers: Twilight' #1 is gorgeously rendered and relevant
Marvel

Comic Books

‘Avengers: Twilight’ #1 is gorgeously rendered and relevant

‘Avengers: Twilight’ #1 takes a look at a possible future for the Marvel’s heroes.

The hype is high for Avengers: Twilight, a new Elseworlds-style look at a possible future where superheroes no longer exist – at least not how we know them. Captain America is quite old and living in a future where he’s out of place. He’s a man out of time, only this time, he’s aged out of being relevant. Can Chip Zdarsky and Daniel Acuña capture our interest in a tale that may not be in continuity? Given Zdarsky’s track record with stories like this (see Spider-Man: Life Story), we’re likely in for an exciting ride.

First and foremost, this book is gorgeous. Acuña’s painterly skills are incredibly well done. There’s a sense of lighting you don’t often see in comics captured here that makes it realistic, but given the brightness and rendering, you can tell it’s maybe even better than real life. It’s akin to Alex Ross’ work – who also supplies the main covers – as it is instantly recognizable and captivating to look at.

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The man-out-of-time theme is strong with this issue from the very first page. We start in Steve Rogers’s apartment, and at first, it looks like it could be today, with New York looking very normal outside the window. Steve is much older, of course, but also seemingly pretty fit. He heads outside, and soon, we’re blasted with hologram tech everywhere and futuristic cars in the streets. This is not a New York we’re familiar with. Soon, we meet Luke Cage, who is evidence age has come for the remaining heroes.

Avengers Twilight #1

The futuristic scene is so beautiful, yet disturbing.
Credit: Marvel

This story’s core is H Day, something we learn about when Steve goes on a news program. Many heroes are gone from this world, and we find out just enough to fascinate us, but of course, more will be revealed later. It’s a day that hangs heavy on Captain America’s heart and seems to have shifted how the world functions and relates to superheroes. Similar to what Jonathan Hickman is doing with Ultimate Spider-Man, it seems a world of heroes in the 616 has taken a turn.

Some elements at work make this narrative fall into the world-outside-your-window perspective. That’s particularly true of news media seemingly rebranding who villains were of the past and through Tony Stark’s child, who has no respect for his elders. Zdarsky seems to be commenting on youngsters today and how their view of the past is tainted, and they easily forget it.

My only gripe at this juncture is not knowing who the main threat is, and instead, it is a mystery hatched with no leads. It’s a common problem with first issues, but it makes it tough to know who Captain America is even fighting in a world that has forgotten him.

Also contained here is a short comic by Ralph Macchio and Walt Simonson featuring Loki. It’s short but sweet as we follow a battle of the original Avengers against Loki, who monologues throughout via captions. It’s not explained how it fits into things, although one might assume Loki will pop up in a future issue, and this story will matter when he does.

A lot of the appeal of Avengers: Twilight rests on its creators showing us what kind of heroes and villains live in a future that has lost its heroes. It’s a world where technology reigns supreme, and everything our elders do for us is taken for granted. What if those elders had a second chance to remind us of their greatness and right wrongs? Avengers Twilight mixes sci-fi and superheroes in a highly relevant take on a world that has forgotten its past and adores fake news.

'Avengers: Twilight' #1 is gorgeously rendered and relevant
‘Avengers: Twilight’ #1 is gorgeously rendered and relevant
Avengers: Twilight #1
A lot of the appeal of Avengers: Twilight rests on its creators showing us what kind of heroes and villains live in a future that has lost its heroes. It's a world where technology reigns supreme, and everything our elders do for us is taken for granted. What if those elders had a second chance to remind us of their greatness and right wrongs? Avengers Twilight mixes sci-fi and superheroes in a highly relevant take on a world that has forgotten its past and adores fake news.
Reader Rating0 Votes
0
This book is excellent even if it didn't have words with incredible visuals
Interesting themes as it deals with aged heroes and a world where the news media can't be trusted
Lacks a direct threat to anticipate
9
Great
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