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Detective Comics #935 Review

Comic Books

Detective Comics #935 Review

The return of the newly originally numbered Detective Comics by James Tynion IV was great. The story and setup seemed like a lot of fun, while the characterization and artwork were fantastic. Can the series keep that going into its next issue? Is it good?

Detective Comics #935 (DC Comics)

Detective Comics #935 Review

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The Breakdown

I’ll keep this nice and simple. The issue is primarily about what the characters are up to after forming their little training group. In the meantime, we see Batman continue his investigation into who attacked Azarel. Story-wise, there’s really not a lot going on here nor are there any big developments until the end of the issue. It’s mostly scenes of the characters just talking with each other about how things are going for them and getting very minor breadcrumb leads on who is behind the attacks. So if you were expecting to learn more about this Bat-militia looking group from last time, you’ll be disappointed here.

In exchange though, you’ll get an issue focused entirely on the characters and their own personal stories. Almost every single part of the cast gets to have moments of humanity, from Tim worried about his future outside of being a crime fighter to Kate talking with her father about the responsibility of training this new team. Even the people who don’t get a significant moment, like Cassandra or Clayface, do have these great moments to show their personality. One of my favorite bits is Clayface asking Tim to borrow a device that he was using during training (it helped him keep a stable form outside of just being mud), because he just wants to spend some time as his former self for once. There’s also solid pacing and dialogue, which helps with all of the character writing. No scene or person takes up too much time in the comic, and it’s smart with how much to show the audience. The dialogue is generally pretty good as well, helping sell some of the more human moments in the comic, like between Tim and Stephanie.

Detective Comics #935 Review
Hey! Stop dodging questions Red Robin! This is not how you build trust with your co-workers!

The artwork is still brought to us by Eddy Barrows, who does a terrific job here like before. His layouts, outside of one little bit, have a good flow and sense of motion to them. His double page spreads, which are very frequent in the issue, look just as good as before with how things unfold in them and how the angles depict each part. The characters are drawn very well too–very expressive, and nothing ever feels off model. Both inker Eber Ferreira and colorist Adriano Lucas lend their hands to the art again, helping build the mood and tone throughout the book. The only negatives are that the characters are occasionally given a more painted style and look to them (I think it’s meant to represent a pivotal character or emotional moment given how these bits pop up). Also, at some points, the backgrounds are just pure white and look ugly in contrast to how usually gorgeous and well detailed the locations are.

Is It Good?

Detective Comics #935, while not having a lot happening in the story, is a terrific showing for each of the characters within it. Everyone came away looking good or having a nice human moment that just captured them very well, which were beautifully rendered by the excellent artwork on the book. So far, this series continues to do well and I’m hoping it stays that way.

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