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Civil War II: Amazing Spider-Man #3 Review

Comic Books

Civil War II: Amazing Spider-Man #3 Review

One of the best parts of Civil War II is the moral choices we must make when given new information about the future. Christos N. Gage and Travel Foreman have without a doubt captured that aspect of the series in this tie-in, but can Amazing Spider-Man sustain a high quality in issue #3? Is it good?

Civil War II: Amazing Spider-Man #3 (Marvel Comics)

Civil War II: Amazing Spider-Man #3 Review

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So what’s it about? The Marvel summary reads:

Ulysses’ visions wreak havoc on Spider-Man. The Amazing Spider-Man and Clash fight a swarm of robots and Clash slide into old habits!

Why does this book matter?

While not directly connected to the Civil War II event, this tie-in is more of a byproduct as Ulysses has helped Spidey turn his friend back into the villain he used to be. Feeling guilty and conflicted about what he’s done, Peter/Spidey must do something to turn things around…but can he?

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?

Civil War II: Amazing Spider-Man #3 Review
I think he needs some moisturizer.

This is another issue where Gage and Foreman (with colors by Rain Beredo) take a usually cliched, been-there-done-that plot and tweak it just enough so it feels fresh. The issue opens with Peter tired as he’s stayed up all night hoping his buddy, now wearing the Clash costume, will accept an offer and hopefully stop him from becoming the villain he used to be. Gage has Clash meet up with the Robot Master and things get complicated from there.

I’m attempting to avoid spoilers, but let’s just say Clash doesn’t do what we think he’s about to do. That’s the first surprise. The second involves a talk Spidey and Clash have (a snippet can be seen below) that does bring up a good point about people who have self destructive habits. Should Cole be allowed to work on the tech that created his villain career and can he be trusted to do it? Like an alcoholic, he needs to go cold turkey, but in the same sense it’s not completely fair. Gage makes a strong case that life isn’t fair when it comes to addictive things in our lives.

Foreman’s art continues to look great in a hyper-detailed sort of way. His skills look particularly good when robots are involved which Robot Master has in droves. Spidey looks fantastic and Foreman’s inks help give everything a darker edge to them.

It can’t be perfect can it?

Due to its lack of connection to the main Civil War II event it isn’t required reading by any means.

While Cole is a sympathetic character for the most part, I’m not sure giving him the crazy bug eyes in the ending pages was the best move. The cliffhanger is pretty much expected which makes it less of a surprise than some earlier scenes. Gage effectively gives Cole all the reasons to do what he does, but unfortunately he looks so crazy there’s no way we can not think he’s in the wrong.

Civil War II: Amazing Spider-Man #3 Review
Well said Christos…I mean Spidey.

Is It Good?

This is fantastic character drama with plenty of action to go with it. You’d be a fool not to check this out!


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