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Ant-Man and the Wasp Adventures Review

Comic Books

Ant-Man and the Wasp Adventures Review

Read the very first Ant-Man and Wasp stories as well as newer all-ages adventures too.

Now that Avengers: Infinity War is over and done with, the next superhero movie to get excited about is Ant-Man and the Wasp. Marvel, ever being the smarty pants publisher, has put out a new digest size comic anthology containing six stories. These stories range from classic Stan Lee and Jack Kirby tales to modern adventures in cartoon style. It’s the perfect quick read to get up to snuff on the characters.

So what’s it about?

The official summary reads:

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Marvel’s size-changing superstars in astonishing adventures! Meet scientist Hank Pym – and find out how he became the man in the anthill! Hank soon harnesses his shrinking prowess to become Ant-Man – joined by his partner-in-crime-fighting, Janet Van Dyne, the high-flying Wasp! And in an all-time classic, Scott Lang – Hank’s successor as Ant-Man – races into action with Hawkeye against the Taskmaster! Plus, it’s Ant-Man and Hulk versus the Mad Thinker, while Wasp must save Captain America from the Wendigo! Tiny foes cause Jan big trouble when invaders from the Microverse attack! And Hawkeye puts Scott Lang through his paces on Monster Island!

Why does this matter?

With the movie coming out soon, why not dive into some fun and light superhero adventures starring Ant-Man (with a Wasp story or two too)? This is meant for 9 to 12 year olds, but it’s made of fun little adventures anyone can enjoy, much like the Avengers Game On collection.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?

Ant-Man and the Wasp Adventures Review

Cartoons turned into comics.

This collection kicks off with a story by Charlotte Fullerton and Kevin Rubio based on the Avengers cartoon. It involves Fin Fang Foom, Monster Island, and a grudge Hawkeye has with Ant-Man (this is the Scott Lang version). It’s one of the lighter stories and plays up the fact that both Hawkeye and Ant-Man used to be criminals.

The second story is written by Christopher Yost with art by Patrick Scherberger and details the intelligence behind Ant-Man being a superpower all its own. Teaming up with Hulk, Ant-Man must stop the Mad Thinker and the art is quite good in a sketchy style. Following that, the creative team dives into a short Wasp story focusing on her heroism as she stands up against a monster to prevent Captain America from getting killed.

The next story written by Christopher Yost and art by Chris Jones is a fun one-liner filled caper involving Iron Man, Wasp, and Captain America. Jones has a Michael Avon Oeming sort of style that’s cartoony and modern. It’s a cute story.

Rounding out this collection is three stories by Stan Lee revealing Ant-Man’s origin, an adventure he has with Wasp, and an adventure requiring some quick thinking as he commands an ant army. This is classic comic book writing at its finest so expect lots of reading and plenty of old school tropes (like how Ant-Man tells Wasp, “Quiet, girl!”

Rounding out this collection is Avengers #223 written by David Michelinie with art by Greg LaRocque. This has the classic cover with Ant-Man poised on Hawkeye’s arrow ready for battle. This is a slightly newer story in comparison to Stan Lee’s work and it plenty of quick thinking and some excellent fight scenes with the Taskmaster. It also bookends well in this collection since it shows another iconic Hawkeye and Ant-Man adventure.

Ant-Man and the Wasp Adventures Review

Read the very first Ant-Man story.

It can’t be perfect can it?

This is a shorter read save for Stan Lee’s verbose chapters so don’t expect this book to last long. It’s also meant for kids, so can you really blame it for being short? There are stories here for a younger audience that come with some hokey jokes and some eye-rolling moments too. It comes with the territory though.

Is it good?

This a fun collection that highlights some iconic Ant-Man and Wasp moments with some newer all-ages style stories. It doesn’t quite succeed as an all-ages read–this is for younger kids–but it’s still fun.

Ant-Man and the Wasp Adventures Review
Ant-Man and the Wasp Adventures
Is it good?
A good collection that captures the early Ant-Man and Wasp stories, but also newer all-ages stories too.
Collects old and new adventures reminding us what makes these characters so interesting
Good art throughout with differing styles for different tastes
Great for younger readers
The stories geared for younger audiences can have some hokey jokes and simplistic plots making it hard to enjoy as an adult
Stan Lee was verbose!
7.5
Good

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