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'Suicide Squad' #7 review: The very human Deadshot
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Comic Books

‘Suicide Squad’ #7 review: The very human Deadshot

This is going to go down as one of the greatest Suicide Squad runs ever.

Suicide Squad continues to be a heavily relatable series. Tom Taylor is a fabulous writer, largely because he never loses sight of the humanity in the characters he writes. Take for example DCeased, which is a wildly dramatic and far-reaching premise, but the book connects with people thanks to the very relatable characters. Issue #7 of Suicide Squad continues to show this via Deadshot as he attempts to connect with his daughter.

Suicide Squad #7 is a good self-contained story even if you haven’t been reading this far. The third act in the issue may come as a bit of a surprise, but this series has been very good at giving us character names via captions. This is basically “Deadshot and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day,” as the character attempts to make amends with his family and things go horribly wrong. There are true moments of positivity for the character, but knowing Deadshot’s luck, it won’t last.

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This issue serves as a great way to set up the next story arc appealing to Deadshot’s deeper purpose to make things right and finally be free. Taylor has been very good at making this series feel like it matters, from introducing new characters and taking them off the board, but also showing real stakes for these characters and real results. This issue is more proof of that.

Suicide Squad #7

Take a moment to soak in the image inside the letters.
Credit: DC Comics

The art by Daniel Sampere, inks Juan Albarran, and colors by Adriano Lucas do an absolutely phenomenal job making this book feel cinematic. Only in hindsight did I realize most of this book is conventional domestic life drama; characters in a normal-looking home talking things out. And yet, I was right there with each character and deeply invested in what they were saying. That’s not easy to do. When things ramp up and the action happens, it continues to be riveting thanks in large part to the blocking and angles taken on the scene. It flows nicely and it doesn’t need to go too big to keep you invested.

This is going to go down as one of the greatest Suicide Squad runs ever. It never loses sight of the humanity in its characters and whatever happens feels important to the characters, the scene, and the book itself.

'Suicide Squad' #7 review: The very human Deadshot
‘Suicide Squad’ #7 review: The very human Deadshot
Suicide Squad #7
This is going to go down as one of the greatest Suicide Squad runs ever. It never loses sight of the humanity in its characters and whatever happens feels important to the characters, the scene, and the book itself.
Reader Rating1 Vote
9.6
Not sure if Deadshot has ever been written any more realistically
Incredible layout, pacing, and blocking of each scene
The opening and closing pages don't flow super well with the meat of the book
9.5
Great
Buy Now
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