Connect with us
Grendel, Kentucky #1
AWA Studios

Comic Books

‘Grendel, Kentucky’ #1 review

Another intriguing debut issue from AWA Studios!

Two siblings are reunited after the death of their father. However, both of them seem to be positive that there’s more to their dad’s death than what they’re being told.

The first issue of Grendel, Kentucky doesn’t deliver much in terms of the spookier side of things, but those elements are definitely going on in the background. The opening sequence of what is presumably Clyde suiting up for a battle with some unknowable evil sets the tone right away. There’s an intensity in his eyes that only belongs to a man consumed by what he must do, and the panels showing how strapped he is really sell the danger of the situation, even without directly showing us what he’s getting into.

Listen to the latest episode of our weekly comics podcast!

That’s a hell of an establishing scene, but where this issue really excels is in the quiet moments. Jeff McComskey and Tommy Lee Edwards give the reader plenty of smaller scenes that establish where these characters are in their lives. Whether it’s Denny moving drugs or the solemn sight of Marnie’s motorcycle gang escorting her to her father’s funeral, we get to learn so much about our protagonists through their silence.

Another intriguing debut issue from AWA Studios!
AWA Studios

However, the voices of the various characters are still very well defined. Right out of the gate, everyone feels like a lived-in character. There’s so much history loaded into every line of dialogue, every interaction. There’s an unspoken tension in the air at all times, making even the quieter moments (and that’s most of what this issue is) feel more dangerous and charged than a bar brawl (but don’t worry; readers get one of those here, too).

John Workman also makes a meal out of the lettering in this issue, particularly when it comes to sound effects. There’s a variation of style and color to each sound effect, with some things having an appropriate crunch to them, while others relay the lightness that should be felt in a certain situation, like a crowd of people laughing.

Again, much of this first issue is concerned with getting the characters together and helping the reader to get to know them. Anyone who is expecting the horror elements to be front loaded in this series may find themselves disappointed. It also jumps around a bit in the early pages, which had me re-reading a page or two to make sure I didn’t miss anything.

However, patient readers will find plenty to latch onto in this introductory chapter. It’s full of strong character work and detailed illustrations. It seems that McComsey and Edwards want us to really know these folks and their hometown before the real horror begins. On that front, this issue succeeds splendidly.

Grendel, Kentucky #1
‘Grendel, Kentucky’ #1 review
Grendel, Kentucky #1
This is an intriguing first issue that leaves the horror on the fringes, taking its time to set up what's to come.
Reader Rating0 Votes
0
The dialogue is very strong, but the book also lets the imagery do the talking more often than not
The brief glimpses we get of the creepy stuff happening on the outskirts of the story are appropriately drenched in dread
The artwork is detailed and gives us a great feel for the townsfolk, while the lettering makes the more heightened sequences pop even more
The narrative jumps around a good bit in the first half of the issue, which occasionally had me feeling like I missed something. It also has me wondering if that's by design
8
Good
Comments

In Case You Missed It

Chadwick Boseman Chadwick Boseman

Marvel Comics to honor Chadwick Boseman with comic cover banner

Comic Books

'Jim Henson's Labyrinth: Masquerade' #1 has two covers one by Jenny Frison and the other by Evan Cagle. 'Jim Henson's Labyrinth: Masquerade' #1 has two covers one by Jenny Frison and the other by Evan Cagle.

BOOM! Studios Announces ‘Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: Masquerade’ #1

Comic Books

The Boys (Amazon Prime) The Boys (Amazon Prime)

‘The Boys’ season 2 episode 5 ‘We Gotta Go’ recap/review

Television

Chuck Taylor, Trent, Santana, and Ortiz put on the greatest parking lot match in the history of wrestling. Chuck Taylor, Trent, Santana, and Ortiz put on the greatest parking lot match in the history of wrestling.

AEW Dynamite’s parking lot fight was one for the ages

Pro Wrestling

Connect
Newsletter Signup