Connect with us
'Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88' #1 is about a droid with ambition
Marvel

Comic Books

‘Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88’ #1 is about a droid with ambition

‘Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88’ gets inside the droid’s head in more ways than one.

The War of the Bounty Hunters event may be over, but don’t count out the excellent new one-shot focused on IG-88 out this week. One might argue a narrative about a robot is likely to be dry and boring, but you’d only think that if you haven’t read Rodney Barnes and Guiu Vilanova’s new issue delving into IG-88’s psychosis as well as his journey to come back to life.

Appropriately titled “Born to Kill,” this one-shot opens on a cold planet where IG-88 lies dead amongst a sea of parts. Captions hover over these scenes from a discussion of death and the ceremonies that take place to honor those who have fallen. It’s different for a droid, though, as there is no hope to be remembered as they have no legacy to leave.

Listen to the latest episode of our Star Wars podcast, Talkin' Tauntauns!

It’s especially different for IG-88, as Barnes and Vilanova show the droid has died a few times and always comes back. Even after facing Darth Vader back in June. We soon learn the narration is coming from a formidable mechanic, but also a person very much in awe of IG-88. His perspective gives the narrative an almost religious angle, as if IG-88 is more than just metal and parts, but something even bigger.

This helps add perspective when IG-88 is eventually put back together. Avoiding the turn in the story that comes as a shock, Barnes further explores the narrative from IG-88’s perspective in the second half. It’s impressive how the narrative pulls out the personality and psychosis of IG-88 through the captions and dialogue.

You begin to read in between the lines and see he’s not just a pile of scrap and code, but a creature that has wants and maybe even dreams. He would never admit or agree to that — in fact, he’d probably blow my brains out for saying it — but it’s part of his charm to see how he’s more human than most droids while rejecting that idea completely.

'Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88' #1 review

This issue recaps a lot for casual readers.
Credit: Marvel

The story ties into the War of the Bounty Hunters event, but for the most part, it picks up IG-88 where we last left him, and then sends him on his way into the eventual Crimson Dawn series, Star Wars: Crimson Reign. Barnes has done a lot to elevate IG-88, giving Charles Soule plenty to work with in Crimson Reign.

The art by Vilanova and colors by Antonio Fabela are fantastic. Whenever blasters or lightsabers are on the page the book brightens, but for the most part, the brown rust and darker tones are visualized well through color. Villanova supplies good detail when it comes to IG-88, and even though he’s a set of red lights and odd shapes, there’s a key scene where you actually feel for the droid. The captions certainly draw you in and the art pushes in with a slight angle as if to show IG-88 is contemplating life.

There’s an indie feel to Vilanova’s pencils, in part due to the layouts taking a few chances and panels speeding up and slowing through layout design. All told, it’s a story that would work on some level even without words.

Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88 is an example of how Star Wars comics enrich characters who are often given very little screen time. It’s also an example of how there is heart and soul in any character, no matter if they are flesh and blood or metal and oil. It’s a sympathetic story about a killer robot that surprises, delights, and makes you think.

'Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88' #1 is about a droid with ambition
‘Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88’ #1 is about a droid with ambition
Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88 #1
Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters: IG-88 is an example of how Star Wars comics enrich characters who are often given very little screen time. It's also an example of how there is heart and soul in any character, no matter if they are flesh and blood or metal and oil. It's a sympathetic story about a killer robot that surprises, delights, and makes you think.
Reader Rating1 Vote
8.7
Interesting structure to the story with two different halves
Catches you up on IG-88's story
Makes you feel for IG-88 even though he's a stone cold killer
Sort of a convenient end for IG-88 to carry on
9.5
Great

Like what we do here at AIPT? Consider supporting us and independent comics journalism by becoming a patron today! In addition to our sincere thanks, you can browse AIPT ad-free, gain access to our vibrant Discord community of patrons and staff members, get trade paperbacks sent to your house every month, and a lot more. Click the button below to get started!

Comments

In Case You Missed It

X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #4 X-Men: The Trial of Magneto #4

There’s still no trial and hardly any Magneto to be found in ‘X-Men: The Trial of Magneto’ #4

Comic Books

Daredevil #36 Daredevil #36

‘Daredevil’ #36 review: The end

Comic Books

Marvel teases 'Destiny of X' era of the X-Men Marvel teases 'Destiny of X' era of the X-Men

Marvel teases ‘Destiny of X’ era of the X-Men

Comic Books

Spider-Men: Worlds Collide Spider-Men: Worlds Collide

Sara Pichelli’s art stuns in ‘Spider-Men: Worlds Collide’, even when their scripts trip over their own webs

Comic Books

Connect
Newsletter Signup