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While I haven't been reviewing Greg Pak’s Action Comics run, I've still been following along.  It’s a pretty darn good and highly enjoyable book, which really captures the character of Superman quite well.  I thought I'd jump back into reviewing the book with this issue, since it ends the first arc and leads into the next Superman event, Doomed.  Is it good?

Comic Books

Is It Good? Action Comics #30 Review

While I haven’t been reviewing Greg Pak’s Action Comics run, I’ve still been following along. It’s a pretty darn good and highly enjoyable book, which really captures the character of Superman quite well. I thought I’d jump back into reviewing the book with this issue, since it ends the first arc and leads into the next Superman event, Doomed. Is it good?

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Action Comics #30 (DC Comics)


action-comics-30-cover

Superman heads to the base of the Ghost Soldiers, ready to destroy the place for all the harm it has done. However, they aren’t going down without a fight, especially their leader, Harrow. Meanwhile, Doomsday is out there somewhere.

action-comics-30-doomsday
You know, you are a bad listener.

This issue takes place after both Forever Evil and Superman/Wonder Woman #7 due to the events that are referenced and seen. As such, there are actual spoilers for these comics within the story, with Doomsday being the most obvious one. After all, last we saw the guy, he was stuck in the Phantom Zone and now he is out for some reason. This is kind of bad and a bit poorly thought out on DC’s part, putting issues out of order (this is easily flexible, since you could simply just switch around Superman/Wonder Woman for this week and make Action Comics next week) and sadly enough, this isn’t the first time has been done in recent memory.

But regardless of an easily remedied release schedule, the comic is still pretty good overall. It’s a solid conclusion to this arc, wrapping up the storyline of the Ghost Solider and the underground empire reasonably well, while also leaving the door open to continue this storyline later. It’s fast paced and thrilling to read, but also knowing when to slow down so the story can have human and powerful moments (the final confrontation between Supes and Harrow). Dialogue is good and Harrow is a decent and interesting villain, though her ranting is a bit clichéd about how her organization is better because they’re humans and they have a better perspective on humanity than an “alien” like Superman. The ending is also alright and seems to have a promising cliffhanger to lead into the Doomed event next month.

action-comics-30-harrow
But you are more of a Jedi Ghost than a monster from the looks of you.

The strongest aspect of the Greg Pak’s entire run, especially with this issue, is the characterization of Superman. He feels exactly like the classic Superman we all know and love. He’s compassionate, caring, willing to set aside differences, and work towards the greater good despite the struggle. Sure, he has his moments of getting mad and angry, especially here in the opening, but he doesn’t let that overtake him. The moments he has in here, especially when talking with Harrow, are especially strong and really get him as a character. If someone has been missing the more classic take on the character, this run will certainly be what you are looking for.

The artwork for the issue is drawn by three different artists: Aaron Kuder (the main artist), Jed Dougherty, and Karl Kerschl. As such, it’s quite obvious at points when artists change, especially when the artwork takes on a more manga-like style. None of these artists are bad by any means, drawing some very impressive imagery and fight scenes. The layouts are fine and the characters look good as well. It’s just a bit distracting when the artists switch all of a sudden.

action-comics-30-rainbow
Considering how fast you are going and how long you have been calling, I wonder how many times you have circled around the Earth.

Is It Good?

Action Comics #30 is a great issue and conclusion to the first arc of Greg Pak’s Action Comics run. The story came to an appropriate end, the characters were great, and there is plenty of potential for the future on where the story will go next. Despite multiple artists and the issue being out of order, I look very forward to where this story goes next time.

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