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Amethyst #1 Review

There is a special rhythm that can only be seen in comic books by singular voices.

There is a special rhythm that can only be seen in comic books by singular voices. From the artistic voice of Amy Reeder comes Amethyst, a genuine assessment of fallout.

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For those unaware of the Young Justice run, Amethyst made her return within that series. There, her nemesis Lord Opal and his army invaded Prime Earth to avenge their Gemworld, which was obliterated due to the multitude of crisis events (look at the meta-narrative fallout of your universe, DC!). The Young Justice team is transferred into Gemworld, where they’re introduced to Amethyst who has lost the trust of the Gem council because her methods are considered undesirable. Following Opal’s defeat, Amethyst decides to go to Earth with the rest of the Young Justice team. After her leaving, the Gem council decides she is banished from Gemworld.

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Now after having a couple of different reboots, and continuity changes since her New 52 run, this miniseries enacts itself as the new status quo. In truth, Reeder borrows from Gaiman, by being additive with the conceit of her plot and formulating a series where almost all of what Amy Winston’s history could have happened.

Within this plotline, following her sixteenth birthday, Amethyst’s return to Gemworld is a stark contrast from her expectations. In truth, it’s this great commentary for teenagers believing their world is centered upon them and their actions don’t have any consequences. Here, the reality is properly affecting Amethyst in this story where she must find the mystery of what occurred with her people. The way this narrative unfolds is a genuine surprise in the way it goes about sowing its seeds. It’s this great look at the ideology of a teenager versus the cold uncaring world that surrounds us.

In earnest, Amy Reeder creates some very intriguing visuals. Each gem is beautifully layered and textured that it reminds one of looking at a graphite drawing by Jono Dry. The depth that she gives them is as refined as her storytelling, and that’s simply in stones. Each panel layout has some unique set of designs, and the way that Gabriela Downie plays with the flow of reading captions on a page provides this unique rhythm that is a joy to read. It’s rare for comics to have a simple mind-meld, and even more rare when its executed to keep an intelligent discussion.

Reeder’s miniseries reads like a lot of fun, but definitely layers itself in the subversion of cliches.

Is it good?
Reeder's miniseries reads like a lot of fun, but definitely layers itself in the subversion of cliches.
Beautifully rendered artwork.
Cool insight for teens.
Awesome storytelling vision.
Heavily cliched, despite subversive events.
7
Good
Comments

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